When ‘Albany’ – a lovely Bichon Frise – arrived at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital in Los Angeles, she was in trouble.

A stone in her ureteral (a small tube that links the kidney to the bladder) had led to an infection and an abscess in her kidney. Usually, treatment requires open surgery with the possibility of removing the kidney, the most common course of action.

However, Dr. Branter  and Dr. Blackburn chose a more modern and less invasive approach. Using a combination of cystoscopy (scope in the bladder) and fluoroscopy (video X-ray) – see below pictures – they were able to place a ureteral ‘stent’ and drain the painful and dangerous abscess.

The good news is that little Ablany required no incisions, was able to keep her kidney, and what’s more, was able to return home the same day.

Go Albany!

stent-fluoro-AlbanyThis is a fluoroscopy picture showing the spine and the sent with on loop in the kidney and one loop in the bladder. Now the urine can pass freely into the bladder.

stent-in-bladder-cystoscopy-AlbanyThis is a picture of the stent in the bladder. The loops are what holds the stent in place in the bladder and the kidney.

UVJ-cystoscopy-AlbanyUVJ (ureterovesicular junction): this is a picture of an opening where urine enter the bladder from the kidney (via the ureter). This is the tube that we place small wires and catheters to allow entry into the kidney.

* A ureteral stent, sometimes called a ureteric stent, is a thin tube inserted into the ureter to prevent or treat obstruction of the urine flow from the kidney.

To find out more about these amazing produces, please contact Dr. Branter at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital in Los Angeles.

Share