Preventing stomach upset in your pets this season.

The holiday season has just begun and there are scrumptious cookies, delectable cakes, and feasts of savory turkey waiting just around the corner! During the holidays, we find ourselves not only being thankful for our family, pets, and friends, but also in the spirit of giving. It can be so hard to say no to those big puppy dog eyes staring at us by the table! Indeed, this is by far the most common season to notice our four legged friends having gastrointestinal (GI) issues—more commonly known as a stomach ache—from table scraps or new treats they are offered with the best of intentions.

When our pets are used to eating one type of food, whether it is canned, grain-free, specialty, or store brand, the body gets used to it and normal bacterial flora grows in the GI tract. This bacteria lives happily in a specific pH that allows balance between health of the intestines and health of the bacteria.

It’s actually much more dangerous than you may think to give in and feed Fido even just the smallest piece of juicy seasoned turkey skin!

Seasonings, fat, and just simply a change in diet can cause inflammation of the entire GI tract, and sometimes the pancreas, too.  Fido’s body will try to get rid of the new substance by vomiting, which is usually followed by loose stool as it passes through the system.  It changes the pH in the intestinal tract and can kill off the good bacteria, allowing bad bacteria to grow. If there is more than one bout of vomiting or diarrhea, however, it is time to visit the vet.  Although I am gearing up for a busy season of gastroenteritis and pancreatitis cases, I hope that we can work together to minimize the GI distress by saying no to the begging this season.  Happy Holidays!

Danielle Sawyer, DVM
Emergency and Critical Care Resident
ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital – Los Angeles

 

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We have a new Medical Director…

Dr-Kathryn-Gates-ER

Kathryn Gates, BVSc, DACVECC, who has been with us since 2010, has been named Medical Director at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital in Los Angeles. She grew up in Auckland, New Zealand, and received her veterinary degree from Massey University in 2002. Dr. Gates became a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care in 2009 and has published articles in the fields of ventilation and plasmapheresis. She has special interests in trauma management, sepsis, and mechanical ventilation.

In addition to other duties, Kathryn will be charged with continuing to foster our positive culture and helping to maintain policies with all staff. She will continue to be a leader and role model for our hospital principles: Compassion, Integrity, Quality, and Service. Kathryn has been a positive, kindhearted, and crucial member of our team, and we are thrilled to welcome her to the position.

Dr-Kathryn-Gates-Medical-Director

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Gordo up and outside…

09/19/2014 – 4:15pm

ACCESS-Specialty-Animal-Hospitals-Gordo

Following surgery yesterday afternoon to repair his leg, ‘Gordo’ is doing well. So much so, he was able to catch a little time outside today with Bonnie Riehl, a Veterinary Technician at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital – Los Angeles.

According to Dr. Kim Carey and Dr. Annie Lo, the surgery went very well. Gordo had an FHO (femoral head ostectomy) which is where the ball of the ball and socket of the femur is removed and scar tissue forms in place of the ball. Patients that undergo this type of surgery are typically able to recover well, and with good post-operative care and management are soon able to run, jump, and play like normal. Gordo who manged a good meal after his operation, remained affable and very affectionate, capturing the hearts of many the doctors and technicians. Yes, he’s one tough little guy!

Dr. Carey and Dr. Lo are optimistic about Gordo’s recovery, and look forward to seeing him during his recheck appointments.

Stay tuned for updates…

#gordo #savethewhitedog

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Congratulations to Clarisa Robles, DVM, DACVIM (Neurology)

We are delighted to announce that Dr. Clarisa Robles is now ‘Board Certified’.

Clarisa-Robles-DVM-DACVIM-(Neurology)This is no simple achievement. Besides having to complete veterinary school, an internship and a residency in a specialized area, further studies have to be undertaken over a number of additional years. This includes a publication accepted in peer reviewed journals, a time consuming and difficult endeavor that demonstrates and proves additional knowledge and expertise in a specific medical field.

So hats-off to Clarisa Robles, DVM, DACVIM (Neurology) who specializes in neurology and who has shown a commitment above and beyond to providing the best possible care for animals. We love you Clarisa!

 
Dr. Robles is based at the ACCESS Los Angeles Specialty Animal Hospital and is available Tuesdays to Fridays for appointments.

Clarisa-Robles-DVM-DACVIM-(Neurology)-2

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Have a little heart…

Brody is a young French Bulldog that was born with a heart murmur.

Using an ultrasound of the heart called an echocardiogram, Dr. Jason Arndt from ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital’s Veterinary Cardiology Department, was able to indentify ‘severe pulmonic stenosis’, a narrowing of the pulmonic outflow from the right ventricle of the heart in little Brody .

The narrowing was putting a large amount of stress on the right side of Brody’s heart, so an interventional procedure called a ‘balloon valvuloplasty’ was performed which significantly improved the stenosis.

Even better news is that the little guy was able to return home the following day!

Below is a picture of Brody’s ‘angiogram’ showing the pulmonic stenosis. (An angiogram is an imaging technique that uses fluoroscopy to visualize blood flow to the arteries and veins.)

Brody-angiogram-Veterinary-Cardiology

The Cardiology Services at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospitals specializes in minimally invasive correction of many congenital cardiac diseases in animals.

 

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A Continuing Education event for Veterinary Technicians…

Chocolate! Humans may love it, but it’s awful for cats and dogs. So are grapes, raisins, macadamia nuts, nicotine, onion/garlic, bread dough (raw), zinc pennies, xylitol, spot-on flea products, illicit drugs, NSAIDs, and, wait for it, tremorogenic mycotoxins!

To find out more, join Dr. Hickey for a lecture and lab on indoor toxins, how to recognize symptons, and what treatment should be considered.

When: Thursday, April 3, 2014
Time: 6:30 pm – Refreshments and introduction | 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm Lecture and Lab
Where: ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital, Los Angeles.

All technicians are welcome to attend.

Please RSVP to:

Carmen Alivera
Tel: 310-558-6100
Email: calivera@accessvetmed.com
Web: www.AccessVetMed.com

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