We love Good Samaritans!

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Without the Good Samaritans who see an injured or ill animal and ask for help, so many pets wouldn’t get the care and treatment they need. Unfortunately, ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospitals are simply not equipped with the space or staff to care for the volume of homeless animals in the area.

Additionally, we have an obligation that requires the person presenting the pet to take responsibility for it. This means that the person has to pay for services, but more importantly, they must make medical decisions for the pet. Obviously, this is an emotional challenge for many individuals, so we ask that you help us by routing those in need to the proper direction.

We encourage all Good Samaritans to take any found animals to the appropriate facility for their species so that they receive medical attention and have the chance to be put in front of thousands of families who are looking to adopt a new pet!

If you have found an animal in need of medical care, please consult the following locations who are able to accept animals.

For Wildlife
California Wildlife Center—cawildlife.org
“If you have found a wild animal that appears to be sick, injured, abandoned or in danger, please call our emergency hotline number. 310.458.WILD [9453]”

Culver City Animal Services: (310) 253-6143
San Pedro International Bird Rescue: (310) 514-2573

For Dogs and Cats
City of Los Angeles—lacity.org
“Individuals may bring an animal to the nearest shelter, or contact the shelter and field personnel will respond. Veterinary medical staff will examine the animal, provide treatment if appropriate and make the animal available for adoption if it is not claimed by its owner. If an animal is critically ill or injured, does not respond to treatment, it will be humanely euthanized.

Shelters are open Sundays 11:00AM to 5:00PM and closed Mondays and Holidays but are open for receiving animals 24 hours daily. (888) 452-7381”

Didn’t find an animal but still want to help? In addition to financial contributions, you can donate food, blankets, bedding, toys, treats, and more to your local rescue or shelter. Many shelters and rescues will accept those items for a variety species!

To Find A Lost Pet
Check out FindingRover.com and FindingKitty.com as well as Los Angeles Animal Services.

 

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Halloween can be scary for pets. Tips on how to care for them…

It’s spooky time again.

But did you know Halloween can be scary for pets? However, with a little planning and information, you and your pets can celebrate safely.

Click on the images below to download our Halloween Pet Safety tips. These ‘free printables’ can be printed with ease! Stick one on your fridge as a reminder, then share them with your friends, at school, or at your place of work.

Be safe and have fun…

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“Survivor. The dog days of cancer.”

We were recently delighted to attend a ‘book launch’, where the author, Dr. Jarred Lyons (Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine) shared some of his thoughts, insights and writing, which we thought we’d share with you…

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“The novel – ‘SURVIVOR – THE DOG DAYS OF CANCER’ – is a fictitious story about perspectives; a dog’s named Eddie’s perspective while being treated for a tumor, Julia, his owner’s perspective about his treatment, and her memories of her own father going through cancer, and the perspectives of everyone involved in the process of cancer treatment.”

“Writing the book was an exciting and challenging project that allowed me to “get into the mind of a dog” and what I feel my patient’s are thinking while they go through cancer treatment.”

“If only we could deal with cancer like our dogs do, devoid of the mental component of the disease that often proves as challenging as the cancer itself.”

Click here to find out more, and purchase, Dr. Lyon’s book.

Dr. Jarred Lyons is a board certified veterinary radiation oncologist who actively practices veterinary radiation oncology with the Veterinary Cancer Group located at the City of Angels Veterinary Center in Los Angeles.

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The first of two important lectures for Veterinary Receptionists.

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The first of two lectures for Veterinary Receptionists pertaining to ‘Compassion Fatigue’ took place yesterday at our new Conference Center in San Fernando Valley.

Provided by ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospitals, and delivered by Kathleen Ayl, Psy.D, the response from attendees who came from a variety of Veterinary Practices, Clinics and Animal Hospitals was overwhelming.

Here is what a few had to say…

“I’m thankful for the invite from ACCESS. This lecture was a blessing and I’m leaving with a sense of knowledge and peace. Thank you.”– MH.

“Dr. Ayl was very informative. Great information, a must for all employees!” – JD

“I experience compassion fatigue daily and therefore this lecture was extremely beneficial and made me rather emotional. Thank you for your time and for sharing your knowledge. I could feel how much you care!” – LS

“I am so grateful I was invited to come out today for this lecture. This information will not only help at work, but in my personal life. This has made a huge impact on my way of thinking. I hope I can share this and have the same impact on others. Thank you!” – AM

“Thank you for giving a name to what so many of us go through and giving us the tools to better ourselves!” – CL

“I really liked listening to Dr. Ayl. She made me feel like she was speaking only to me a few times.”– BG

“Excellent. Very informative. I love Dr. Ayl, she is wonderful, kind, and sensitive.” – SP

“Great speaker! Very well spoken and a calming voice.” – MM

Thank you to all attendees, and we look forward to repeating this lecture to the more than forty Receptionists who are planning to attend next Monday evening.

We look forward to seeing you there.

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