Archive for the ACCESS South Bay Category

Dr. Zimmerman visits Costa Rica…


During a recent trip to Costa Rica, I had the amazing opportunity to visit the Jaguar Rescue Center and donate much needed medical supplies on behalf of ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital — South Bay.

The Jaguar Rescue Center (JRC) is a temporary or permanent home for ill, injured and orphaned animals in southern Costa Rica, just outside of Puerto Viejo. With a focus on birds, reptiles, amphibians and small primates, the JRC provides veterinary services, round-the-clock care and comfort to animals that would otherwise be unable to survive in the rainforest or the sea of the Caribbean.

The JRC has a full-service hospital where injured or ill animals receive medications, special diets, physical therapy, and even surgery! The primary goal of the JRC is rehabilitation and return to the wild. In this, the JRC has an amazing track record. The La Ceiba Primary Forest serves as a release point for animals which will be returned to the wild. Even animals who cannot be released due to injury can be taken on “day excursions” into the primary forest. An amazing example I witnessed was an anteater who had suffered brain damage after being struck by a vehicle. He would not survive alone in the wild. He does, however, get the opportunity daily to experience the wild of the primary forest with a chaperone.

The JRC finds space and rehabilitates any and all animals native to the area, even full grown crocodiles! One of the more recognizable animals in Costa Rica is the sloth. Many sloth babies are orphaned when the mother is electrocuted grabbing an electrical wire rather than a tree or vine. The rehabilitation of an orphan is an extensive process. If a sloth cannot be returned to the wild, they can live up to 40 years, a big commitment! The permanent residents are given proper food, exercise, and access to the beach or jungle to maintain the best quality of life.

If you would like to donate or visit the Jaguar Rescue Center, please find them at jaguarrescue.foundation/

Click on the below pics to enjoy ‘bigger’ cuteness…
Discover more about Dr. Zimmerman

Share

Meet Duckie with her fashionable vest…


Meet Duckie! She is sporting a fashionable vest that holds a Holter monitor. Holter monitors are used to diagnose arrhythmias by continuously recording an animal’s heart rate and rhythm over a period of 24 hours.

Pets with intermittent episodes of weakness or collapse may have a Holter monitor placed by the ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital’s Cardiology team to determine if an abnormal heart rhythm is the underlying cause of signs seen at home. The vests protect the monitoring device while pets go about their daily activities. If your pet’s cardiologist recommends a Holter monitor, your pet can also strut their stuff for a day in their very own form fitting black vest.

Share

Tails from the road – Doctor Edition!

We love it when our specialists take the time to visit local primary veterinary hospitals. Whether it’s because our doctors are new to ACCESS, are bringing holiday cheer, or simply want to check-in and say hello, you never know where and when you might spot them on the road!

Share

Quality Control K9

Dr. Timothy Krebs brought his very own pup, Buddy, to check out the hospital. Buddy became the self-appointed Quality Control Supervisor. When asked about his new position, Buddy said “It’s ruff, but doggone it, I love it!”

Share

Feeding Tubes Save Lives!


 
Flower is a young, cuddly rescue cat who was hospitalized at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital – South Bay for intensive care for treatment of upper respiratory issues including sneezing, nasal discharge, and anorexia from severe ulcerations on her tongue.

The ulcers were caused by a calicivirus (ka-lee-see virus) infection which is common in the upper respiratory disease complex of cats. Unlike the Mother of Dragons, this calici is a nasty infection affecting only cats.

The ulcers caused such severe pain in poor Flower’s mouth that she would drool profusely, refusing to eat anything offered. We also tried to feed her with a syringe, which means her food was liquefied and then gently squirted into her mouth, which was also a very negative experience.

Needing to find a way to treat Flower, she had a feeding tube placed in her esophagus to help make sure she was getting all of the food and water she needed. The feeding tube also helps with giving medications that would normally be given orally. This way, our team can make sure Flower gets everything she needs to get better without struggling to swallow.

There are several types of feeding tubes, but to insert this specific feeding tube, also known as an E-tube, Flower was placed under anesthesia so she wouldn’t feel a thing. Next, her doctor made a small incision and placed the feeding tube in her esophagus with part of it exposed so that medical staff can complete treatments and feed her. Feeding tubes are typically temporary and are kept clean with a fashionable cloth collar to protect the incision site.

The recovery from Flower’s infection took several weeks, but after three weeks of care, she began to eat on her own again! Once she was eating on her own regularly, the feeding tube was removed and she was ready to leave the hospital.

If you are interested in fostering or adopting this precious little girl, please contact the Stray Cat Alliance Rescue of Los Angeles.

Share

Take a 360° tour of ACCESS – South Bay.

 

Share

Paweseome Animal Ambassadors

Charlie and Dink belong to Krys, the assistant to Cardiologist, Dr. Sarah Zimmerman. In addition to snuggling and looking cute, they love to rep ACCESS Speciality Animal Hospitals with their snazzy bandanas!

Share

Dr. Townsell Scopes Out the Issues…

Dr. Marlene Townsell is an Internal Medicine Specialist at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital – South Bay. She’s seen here performing an endoscopy on her patient, an adorable tabby! Endoscopy is a tool doctors use to see inside the digestive system.

To learn more about how endoscopy works, click here!


Share

Long Beach Pride 2017

We had a blast at the 2017 Long Beach Pride Festival!

We were in our booth Saturday and Sunday to hand out giveaways and information-and we met so many wonderful people! Our team had a great time at the booth, and we were proud to see Amanda from IT complete the 5K and take home a silver medal for being the second fastest woman in her age group!





Share

ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospitals at ACVIM 2017!

We had a blast at ACVIM, which is a veterinary conference for all of the specialties under the Internal Medicine College such as cardiology, neurology, and internal medicine.

We spent two full days in our booth in the exhibit hall to meet new doctors, specialists, and technicians. It was so nice to catch up with old friends Luke and Indy from Puppy Up, and of course our veterinary pals.

Share
Page 1 of 3123

Locations

South Bay

2551 W. 190th St., Torrance, CA 90504

Tel: (310) 320-8300 - Fax: (424) 293-7254

Los Angeles

9599 Jefferson Blvd., Culver City, CA 90232

Tel: (310) 558-6100 - Fax: (310) 558-6199

San Fernando Valley

20051 Ventura Blvd., Woodland Hills, CA 91364

Tel: (818) 887-2262 - Fax: (818) 704-0323

Central Valley

4300 Easton Drive, Bakersfield, CA 93309

Tel: (661) 281-1320 - Fax: (661) 302-4193

Click here for maps (and to find directions)