Archive for the Interventional Radiology Category

Listen to Dr. Branter on Pet Life Radio…

There is an adage attributed to surgeons – a chance to cut is a chance to cure. For a time, this statement was probably true. A doctor had a limited number of ways of seeing what was going on inside of a body and correcting a problem. Now humans and animals are benefiting from myriad of minimally invasive procedures that can diagnose, treat and often cure conditions where previously a scalpel could never go.

Erinne Branter is a board certified veterinary internist at Advanced Critical Care, Emergency and Specialty Services in Los Angeles who has harnessed the magic of interventional radiology and endoscopy. – Bernadine D. Cruz, D.V.M., Host on Pet Life Radio. (www.petliferadio.com)

Listen to the full interview/broadcast by clicking on the image below.

IR-radio

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Ten minutes is all Geordie needed…

Geordie
This little guy, Geordie, has the unfortunate history of forming stones in his bladder.

A year ago, he had a minimally invasive procedure to remove his stones and lithotripsy (a medical procedure that uses shock waves to break up stones in the kidney, bladder, or ureter) to remove stones that were lodged in his urethra. Ouch.

Now Geordie is checked every one to three months with a simple X-ray to see if any new stones have formed and if so, to catch them while they are small. The good news is that we can deal with these small stones with a simple procedure (voiding urethrohydropulsion) to flush them out of the bladder.

This avoids any surgery and takes only ten minutes! (Of course Geordie is delighted as there is no need for surgery)
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To find out more about these amazing produces, please contact Dr. Branter at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital in Los Angeles.

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Kept his kidney and was in and out in a day…

When ‘Albany’ – a lovely Bichon Frise – arrived at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital in Los Angeles, she was in trouble.

A stone in her ureteral (a small tube that links the kidney to the bladder) had led to an infection and an abscess in her kidney. Usually, treatment requires open surgery with the possibility of removing the kidney, the most common course of action.

However, Dr. Branter  and Dr. Blackburn chose a more modern and less invasive approach. Using a combination of cystoscopy (scope in the bladder) and fluoroscopy (video X-ray) – see below pictures – they were able to place a ureteral ‘stent’ and drain the painful and dangerous abscess.

The good news is that little Ablany required no incisions, was able to keep her kidney, and what’s more, was able to return home the same day.

Go Albany!

stent-fluoro-AlbanyThis is a fluoroscopy picture showing the spine and the sent with on loop in the kidney and one loop in the bladder. Now the urine can pass freely into the bladder.

stent-in-bladder-cystoscopy-AlbanyThis is a picture of the stent in the bladder. The loops are what holds the stent in place in the bladder and the kidney.

UVJ-cystoscopy-AlbanyUVJ (ureterovesicular junction): this is a picture of an opening where urine enter the bladder from the kidney (via the ureter). This is the tube that we place small wires and catheters to allow entry into the kidney.

* A ureteral stent, sometimes called a ureteric stent, is a thin tube inserted into the ureter to prevent or treat obstruction of the urine flow from the kidney.

To find out more about these amazing produces, please contact Dr. Branter at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital in Los Angeles.

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We really do love them all…

Billy, a two year old Pacman frog, otherwise known as an Ornate Horned Frog, was brought to ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital (Los Angeles) on emergency for a possible dislocated shoulder. After we performed a complete physical exam, we found he had an impaction in his stomach which was so large it was pushing his arm and shoulder in an abnormal position.

Our ‘Exotics’ veterinarian, Dr. Petritz, anesthetized Billy to perform endoscopy of his stomach in coordination with one of our internal medicine specialists, Dr. Branter .

The great news is that Dr. Petritz, Dr. Branter and their team were able to relieve the impaction, and are happy to report Billy is back to his normal self, and croaking away.

IR-frog-2

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Locations

South Bay

2551 W. 190th St., Torrance, CA 90504

Tel: (310) 320-8300 - Fax: (424) 293-7254

Los Angeles

9599 Jefferson Blvd., Culver City, CA 90232

Tel: (310) 558-6100 - Fax: (310) 558-6199

San Fernando Valley

20051 Ventura Blvd., Woodland Hills, CA 91364

Tel: (818) 887-2262 - Fax: (818) 704-0323

Click here for maps (and to find directions)

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