Archive for the Avian & Exotics Category

A prickly feast…

Here’s an interesting little guy enjoying a hearty feast.

(Did you know that Dr. Petritz, who heads our Avian and Exotics Department, specializes in caring for rare and exotic pets, no matter how prickly they are…?)

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We support Apple…

In light of Apple’s recent ‘bending’ issues, and the thousands of comments made on Twitter (#bendgate #iphone6bend) we thought we’d offer our support…

ACCESS-Bending

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It’s for the birds…

“What exactly is parrot fever, and can I get it from my bird? I’ve heard wild birds can be affected with West Nile Virus, but can my parrot get sick from that disease as well? What is the difference between avian tuberculosis and human tuberculosis? Can I get TB from my bird?”

To hear the answers and to find our more, please join Dr. Olivia Petritz, our board-certified avian and exotics veterinarian, at her presentation on Avian Infectious Diseases and Zoonotic Diseases of Parrots at the West Valley Bird Society on Friday, May 16th, at 7:30 p.m.

So if you’re a bird lover, or simply curious, you are more than welcome to come alone.

To find out more, please visit the West Valley Bird Society website.

Olivia-Petritz-Bird

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Valentino – now hopping happy.

Valentino-Avian-Exotics-Vet-Care
 
Valentino is a 6+ year old rabbit that was referred to us for a bloated stomach, and not eating or defecating. Our exotics specialist, Dr. Olivia Petritz, performed emergency surgery early in the morning, and removed an obstruction from his intestines. He did great after surgery, and has never looked back!

A rabbit that is not eating or defecating, even for as little as 4-6 hours, should be brought to an exotics veterinarian as soon as possible. This condition is commonly known as “GI stasis” and is a symptom of many underlying diseases, one of which is an obstruction of their gastrotintestinal (GI) system. Unlike dogs and cats, rabbits cannot vomit, so an obstruction of their GI tract can be fatal if not treated promptly.

ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital is one of the ONLY hospitals in the greater Los Angeles area that is capable of performing these surgeries on rabbits and other exotics 24/7, including nights and weekends.

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Listen to Dr. Petritz on Pet Life Radio…

…bring your local veterinarian a sick dog or cat and they will adroitly determine what is ailing it. Bring them a guinea pig, hamster, bird or fish that ‘just isn’t right’ and they will likely be flummoxed. Though veterinarians are trained to care for all species, the nuances of tending to the general well being of small mammals, birds, reptiles and fish are a very focused subspecialty of pet care.

What can an owner of one of these unique pets do to keep them healthy? What are some of the common emergencies to which they are prone? What can they do to prevent them? The answer to these questions is a diplomate of the American College of Zoological Medicine. This is a title held by less than 200 veterinarians in the entire world. My guest, Olivia Petritz has the distinction of being one of two in this elite assemblage to hold a sub-specialty in Zoological Companion Animals. – Bernadine D. Cruz, D.V.M., Host on Pet Life Radio. (www.petliferadio.com)

Listen to the full interview/broadcast by clicking on the image below.

Exotics-radio

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Our ‘Exotic’ Doctor…

Avian-&-Exotics-Rack-Card

Olivia A. Petritz, DVM, DACZM

ACCESS – LOS ANGELES
Although all American College of Zoological Medicine (ACZM)* Diplomates have the same ‘DACZM’ title, several years ago ACZM created a sub-specialty that encompasses all exotic pet species such as small mammals, rodents, birds, reptiles, and fish, and gave it the title: ‘ZCA’ for ‘Zoological Companion Animal’.

The first person in the world to acquire this unique veterinary qualification resides in Germany. The second was Olivia A. Petritz, DVM, DACZM.

With her degree in veterinary medicine from Purdue University, a three-year ACZM residency at UC Davis in Companion Avian and Exotic Pet Medicine, an internship in small animal medicine and critical care in San Diego, and a specialty internship in avian and exotic animal medicine in Houston, she is a wonderful member of the ACCESS Team.

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We really do love them all…

Billy, a two year old Pacman frog, otherwise known as an Ornate Horned Frog, was brought to ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital (Los Angeles) on emergency for a possible dislocated shoulder. After we performed a complete physical exam, we found he had an impaction in his stomach which was so large it was pushing his arm and shoulder in an abnormal position.

Our ‘Exotics’ veterinarian, Dr. Petritz, anesthetized Billy to perform endoscopy of his stomach in coordination with one of our internal medicine specialists, Dr. Branter .

The great news is that Dr. Petritz, Dr. Branter and their team were able to relieve the impaction, and are happy to report Billy is back to his normal self, and croaking away.

IR-frog-2

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Locations

South Bay

2551 W. 190th St., Torrance, CA 90504

Tel: (310) 320-8300 - Fax: (424) 293-7254

Los Angeles

9599 Jefferson Blvd., Culver City, CA 90232

Tel: (310) 558-6100 - Fax: (310) 558-6199

San Fernando Valley

20051 Ventura Blvd., Woodland Hills, CA 91364

Tel: (818) 887-2262 - Fax: (818) 704-0323

Click here for maps (and to find directions)

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