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ACCESS-Animal-Hospital-Blog

Quality Control K9

Dr. Timothy Krebs brought his very own pup, Buddy, to check out the hospital. Buddy became the self-appointed Quality Control Supervisor. When asked about his new position, Buddy said “It’s ruff, but doggone it, I love it!”

Feeding Tubes Save Lives!


 
Flower is a young, cuddly rescue cat who was hospitalized at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital – South Bay for intensive care for treatment of upper respiratory issues including sneezing, nasal discharge, and anorexia from severe ulcerations on her tongue.

The ulcers were caused by a calicivirus (ka-lee-see virus) infection which is common in the upper respiratory disease complex of cats. Unlike the Mother of Dragons, this calici is a nasty infection affecting only cats.

The ulcers caused such severe pain in poor Flower’s mouth that she would drool profusely, refusing to eat anything offered. We also tried to feed her with a syringe, which means her food was liquefied and then gently squirted into her mouth, which was also a very negative experience.

Needing to find a way to treat Flower, she had a feeding tube placed in her esophagus to help make sure she was getting all of the food and water she needed. The feeding tube also helps with giving medications that would normally be given orally. This way, our team can make sure Flower gets everything she needs to get better without struggling to swallow.

There are several types of feeding tubes, but to insert this specific feeding tube, also known as an E-tube, Flower was placed under anesthesia so she wouldn’t feel a thing. Next, her doctor made a small incision and placed the feeding tube in her esophagus with part of it exposed so that medical staff can complete treatments and feed her. Feeding tubes are typically temporary and are kept clean with a fashionable cloth collar to protect the incision site.

The recovery from Flower’s infection took several weeks, but after three weeks of care, she began to eat on her own again! Once she was eating on her own regularly, the feeding tube was removed and she was ready to leave the hospital.

If you are interested in fostering or adopting this precious little girl, please contact the Stray Cat Alliance Rescue of Los Angeles.

Cone of Shame!

Although it’s necessary, Goose is not happy about her cone! Despite her expression, Goose had a great visit at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital – San Fernando Valley, where she not only received treatment, but lots of love too!

Crappy day turned great visit!

Falcon came to see our San Fernando Valley team due to a bout of…diarrhea. Luckily we got him back to health and sent him home with his family, but not before we got some snuggles in!

Intussusception Interception…


 
Jeff is a Basset Hound puppy who came to us with intussusception which is when the intestines telescope in on themselves. Left untreated, intussusception can kill the animal – or human – affected by it.

This actually happened twice with Jeff. Luckily when Dr. Annie Lo, a board-certified surgeon, went in to reverse the intussusception, it had self-corrected so fixing it with surgery wasn’t necessary!

She also took samples to biopsy to be sure this pup was healthy. Dr. Steven Centola (pictured) also oversaw Jeff’s care while he was in the hospital and much like everyone else at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital – Los Angeles, he fell in love with Jeff!

 

Another Bone & Joint Center Success…

Nola is a very sweet pup who tore a ligament that holds part of the Achilles tendon in her left leg causing it to luxate, or dislocate, while she was playing with another dog.

Her condition, known as luxation of the superficial digital flexor tendon, required surgery to repair the ligament and allow her to return to function. Luckily, Dr. Laurent Guiot was able to correct this with surgery and send Nola home with her loving parents!

How does a Holter Monitor work?

…allow Dr. Emily Chapel from ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital – Los Angeles explain.

Heat Stroke: Quiet, Quick, and Deadly

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Hermes is a lovable, energetic two-year-old Pitbull who came to us after he went hiking with his doting mom in the morning on one of the first days of a heatwave in Southern California. After the hike, they returned home and Hermes seemed perfectly normal, so mom went out for about one hour. When she returned home however, she found Hermes in distress.

Within the span of a 45 minute hike, Hermes suffered severe heat stroke and burns to his paw pads and toes. Heat stroke happens when your body can no longer get rid of the extra heat inside of it. Your body then begins to become affected by the heat, resulting in organ damage and eventually death.

His paws were bleeding, he had diarrhea, and was lethargic. His owner had to act quickly, so she did the right thing and rushed him to their local vet where he was bathed to reduce his temperature and was then referred to ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital – Los Angeles.

Here, he was taken in right away and diagnosed with bruised skin, an irregular heartbeat, a blood clotting disorder, GI bleeding, kidney injuries, lameness, and severe paw pad abrasions. Hermes was started on fluids, and IV medications to stabilize him and reduce his pain, and had his paws cleaned and bandaged. He continued his medication and fluids, as well as a plasma transfusion to help reverse the damage caused by the heat. He will continue to be monitored for changes and treated for his condition.

Unfortunately, Hermes is not alone. Heatstroke can affect humans and animals within a matter of minutes with symptoms sometimes being very subtle.

'Hermes' B

'Hermes'-E

Achilles Finds A Forever Home

Achilles came to ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital – Los Angeles when he was dropped off by a Good Samaritan, bloody and covered in mats. Our team shaved him down and found a gnarly injury on his hind leg. With no family and a desperate need for surgery, things were looking rough for this pup!

Luckily, Casey, an RVT in our emergency room, stepped in and adopted him. She named him Achilles, given the injury that brought them together, and after his leg was amputated, he was able to come home.

He loves his new family and gets around quite well on three legs!




Lily came in for a checkup…

Lily came in for a checkup looking like a perfect little flower after healing from her TPLO. A TPLO (Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy) is a knee surgery performed on dogs to stabilize their stifle joint.

Click here to learn more about TPLO!


Locations

South Bay

2551 W. 190th St., Torrance, CA 90504

Tel: (310) 320-8300 - Fax: (424) 293-7254

Los Angeles

9599 Jefferson Blvd., Culver City, CA 90232

Tel: (310) 558-6100 - Fax: (310) 558-6199

San Fernando Valley

20051 Ventura Blvd., Woodland Hills, CA 91364

Tel: (818) 887-2262 - Fax: (818) 704-0323

Click here for maps (and to find directions)

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