Furry and Fabulous!

Davis belongs to one of our amazing technicians at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital – Los Angeles and he’s excited to go as Stitch for Halloween!

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Quality Control K9

Dr. Timothy Krebs brought his very own pup, Buddy, to check out the hospital. Buddy became the self-appointed Quality Control Supervisor. When asked about his new position, Buddy said “It’s ruff, but doggone it, I love it!”

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Feeding Tubes Save Lives!


 
Flower is a young, cuddly rescue cat who was hospitalized at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital – South Bay for intensive care for treatment of upper respiratory issues including sneezing, nasal discharge, and anorexia from severe ulcerations on her tongue.

The ulcers were caused by a calicivirus (ka-lee-see virus) infection which is common in the upper respiratory disease complex of cats. Unlike the Mother of Dragons, this calici is a nasty infection affecting only cats.

The ulcers caused such severe pain in poor Flower’s mouth that she would drool profusely, refusing to eat anything offered. We also tried to feed her with a syringe, which means her food was liquefied and then gently squirted into her mouth, which was also a very negative experience.

Needing to find a way to treat Flower, she had a feeding tube placed in her esophagus to help make sure she was getting all of the food and water she needed. The feeding tube also helps with giving medications that would normally be given orally. This way, our team can make sure Flower gets everything she needs to get better without struggling to swallow.

There are several types of feeding tubes, but to insert this specific feeding tube, also known as an E-tube, Flower was placed under anesthesia so she wouldn’t feel a thing. Next, her doctor made a small incision and placed the feeding tube in her esophagus with part of it exposed so that medical staff can complete treatments and feed her. Feeding tubes are typically temporary and are kept clean with a fashionable cloth collar to protect the incision site.

The recovery from Flower’s infection took several weeks, but after three weeks of care, she began to eat on her own again! Once she was eating on her own regularly, the feeding tube was removed and she was ready to leave the hospital.

If you are interested in fostering or adopting this precious little girl, please contact the Stray Cat Alliance Rescue of Los Angeles.

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Cone of Shame!

Although it’s necessary, Goose is not happy about her cone! Despite her expression, Goose had a great visit at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital – San Fernando Valley, where she not only received treatment, but lots of love too!

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Crappy day turned great visit!

Falcon came to see our San Fernando Valley team due to a bout of…diarrhea. Luckily we got him back to health and sent him home with his family, but not before we got some snuggles in!

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Intussusception Interception…


 
Jeff is a Basset Hound puppy who came to us with intussusception which is when the intestines telescope in on themselves. Left untreated, intussusception can kill the animal – or human – affected by it.

This actually happened twice with Jeff. Luckily when Dr. Annie Lo, a board-certified surgeon, went in to reverse the intussusception, it had self-corrected so fixing it with surgery wasn’t necessary!

She also took samples to biopsy to be sure this pup was healthy. Dr. Steven Centola (pictured) also oversaw Jeff’s care while he was in the hospital and much like everyone else at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital – Los Angeles, he fell in love with Jeff!

 

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