Breaking New Ground!

We are pleased to announce that we’re about to begin the build out for our brand new building on 190th in Torrance!

This two story facility will house cutting-edge equipment, several veterinary specialties, and dozens of loving, dedicated people to care for your pets.

We are very excited about this new adventure and will be posting updates periodically. Stay tuned.

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First Floor
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Second Floor
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A bunny with no appetite…

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Baleine is a beautiful one-year-old giant breed French Lop rabbit who came to see Dr. Karen Schachterle as an emergency transfer from her primary veterinarian. She had been lethargic and had no appetite for several days, which in rabbits can be life threatening.

Once Dr. Schachterle examined Baleine, it was determined that she had a liver lobe torsion, which means one of the lobes of her liver twisted inside of her, cutting off its own blood supply. This is an emergency, as this condition can become deadly if not treated immediately.

Because the affected portion of the liver had been bleeding into her abdomen, Baleine required a blood transfusion to be stable enough for surgery. Linda Bailey from Too Many Bunnies (a rabbit rescue organization) volunteered four giant breed rabbits as possible blood donors. Colorado, a handsome Flemish giant, was selected and donated blood to Baleine. Once the blood transfusion had started, our surgeon Dr. Annie Lo and the exotics team took Baleine to surgery to address the torsion.

Baleine stayed at ACCESS for a few days following surgery. Once she had recovered, Baleine was able to go home to her loving family, where she is a service animal for a little girl.

If you suspect your pet may be having an emergency, do not hesitate to contact your regular veterinarian or nearest emergency room.

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Tails from the Road – Lectures Edition!

ACCESS had a busy week bringing our doctors and staff to speak at different events. Here is a glimpse into what we were up to:

Platt College in Alhambra invited ACCESS back again to talk to techs in training. Gabe Esparza spoke about life as an ACCESS RVT, and his background leading up to where he is now at our South Bay hospital. Gabe said has not had a dull moment in the ER and he shared his insights with the group of 15 students. They asked what he looks for in employees that he works with, and how he studied for the VTNE. He also spoke about the ACCESS Academy that new hires go through during their first 90 days to succeed in their department. Maybe they will work for ACCESS one day!

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Dr. Karen Schachterle, from our Avian & Exotics Department, spoke about surviving exotics emergencies at the DVM2k dinner held at City of Angels. The event is aimed as “the youthful veterinary community” although there were people of all ages there, ranging from doctors, to techs, to students. Everyone was genuinely interested in learning what they could from Dr. Schachterle to apply in their own practice, and attendees who already work with her were able to ask questions of her to build on their relationship so exotic emergencies don’t have to be so scary.

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Leah Basinais, Director of Operations at ACCESS, gave a lunch and learn for staff at Conejo Valley Veterinary Hospital in Thousand Oaks on compliance and estimate acceptance. It was a condensed version of a Continuing Education lecture she gave recently at our Woodland Hills hospital, and fear not if you missed it and think it would benefit your practice, she is going on tour! For now, Leah will be giving this same talk in Cerritos and Bakersfield in September, the South Bay in November, and Culver City in December so stay tuned for more info.

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The North Bay/Westside VMA chapter had their monthly dinner meeting and Dr. Mike Becker, from our Emergency and Critical Care Department in Culver City gave a lecture on antimicrobial use in emergency situations. It was a huge turnout with the hotel running out of chairs at one point, so it must be because word got out that ACCESS was sponsoring and Dr. Becker had an interesting topic. We look forward to him giving the lecture at ACCESS Culver City sometime next year!

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How is a Pitbull Not a Pitbull?

Pitbull is actually a common name for several types of dogs!

Formal breeds that are often considered to be Pitbulls include the American Pit Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrier, American Bully, and Staffordshire Bull Terrier.

Here, our Client Care Supervisor, Airami, snuggles his Pitbull Hazel before her Internal Medicine exam.

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How Does an Ultrasound Work?

In an ultrasound examination, a probe sends sound waves to the body and receives the echoing waves, creating an image on the screen. It’s a great way to examine the inside of the body in a painless, non-invasive way.

Here Dr. Gideon Daniel, one of our Internal Medicine specialists, demonstrates some of his techniques on a mango! He showed us how to perform an ultrasound as well as how to collect a sample—we commonly take urine and fluid samples during an ultrasound to run further diagnostics.

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Labradoodles Have an Interesting History

Did you know that Labradoodles came about when an Australian breeder successfully crossed the Labrador retriever and standard poodle? They wanted to create a guide dog for the blind that would be compatible for those allergic to fur and dander!

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