Shea: Client Care Extraordinaire…

Shea

Shea Heagle is one of the many amazing people in our client care team at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital – Los Angeles. Shea is bright, funny, and compassionate; and we wanted to know what brought her to her current position at ACCESS.

Why veterinary medicine?

Shea never intended to work in veterinary medicine per se, but during a job search she found a description that fit her-customer service, love of people, and working around animals. When she was in high school, Shea hadn’t figured out what she wanted to do just yet…until she met her English teacher who inspired her to work with others.

What brought Shea to ACCESS?

This Pasadena native earned her Master’s degree in Educational Counseling from the University of Laverne and wanted to apply those skills in a new setting. Shea genuinely loves people and has always “worked in the people business.” We think her knowledge and experience is crucial to her position and Client Care is something she excels at.

Where is her favorite place to visit?

Shea loves the beach-Miami, Florida to be exact. This West Coast gal loves to vacation where the water is always warm and the people are super friendly.

What is Shea’s favorite animal and why?

Shea has absolutely no idea where her love of Polar Bears came from, but she adores them! She also has a fondness for Golden Retrievers because “they’re adorable and precious.”

What would she be doing if she weren’t working at ACCESS?

“Working in a school.”

What is her favorite meal?

“Mexican food for sure! I could eat chips and salsa all day, every day.”

Does Shea collect anything?

Shea loves bottle openers and has between 10 and 15 that she has collected over the years as souvenirs.

What is the most challenging case Shea has had?

The life of an emergency room Client Care Representative can be trying both physically and emotionally, so it is no surprise that Shea’s most challenging and most rewarding case involved an ER patient. A client had brought in his cat on emergency-the poor kitty was in critical condition. After much thought, discussion, and time spent with his pet, the owner made the difficult decision to euthanize. Shea was with the client and his pet from the very start and spent time speaking with him about his cat’s long, fulfilling life and the love that he had for his dear pet. Shea was emotionally invested in the case and it saddened her deeply to see this client so heartbroken. Before leaving, he told Shea he was going home feeling better because of her.

What is Shea’s advice for pet owners?

Do not procrastinate in seeking medical attention for you pets, because some things can worsen while you wait.

What does she consider to be her greatest achievement?

“Getting my Masters.” We can’t agree enough with that! Shea has achieved an amazing degree in a field that she is passionate about. We are proud to work with someone that is so dedicated to counseling and caring for others.

We are lucky to see Shea’s talents utilized every day that she’s at ACCESS. Outside of work, Shea loves to try out new Pinterest recipes, her latest being a steak roll-up!  From working closely with clients and doctors, to speaking with admin and connecting with her peers, Shea oozes compassion, integrity, intelligence, and a great sense of humor. We are grateful to have found such a great team member, coworker, and friend.

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A Wild Rabbit’s Wild Ride…

Piston is a young male rabbit that is believed to be about one year old. The little bunny came to ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital, Los Angeles, after a long ride from Nevada to Manhattan Beach—inside the engine of a Toyota Sienna! Luckily, technicians at the Manhattan Beach Toyota Dealership were able to remove Piston from the engine. Avian and exotics specialist, Dr. Olivia Petritz, examined Piston and found no injuries. Miraculously, this wild little guy was in great condition! He is still doing well and has plans to be released by a licensed wildlife rehabilitator.

It is important to note that only licensed wildlife rehabilitators are legally allowed to care for wild animals. Please contact your local wildlife rehabilitation center if you find a sick or injured wild animal.

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