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ACCESS-Animal-Hospital-Blog

Valentino – now hopping happy.

Valentino-Avian-Exotics-Vet-Care
 
Valentino is a 6+ year old rabbit that was referred to us for a bloated stomach, and not eating or defecating. Our exotics specialist, Dr. Olivia Petritz, performed emergency surgery early in the morning, and removed an obstruction from his intestines. He did great after surgery, and has never looked back!

A rabbit that is not eating or defecating, even for as little as 4-6 hours, should be brought to an exotics veterinarian as soon as possible. This condition is commonly known as “GI stasis” and is a symptom of many underlying diseases, one of which is an obstruction of their gastrotintestinal (GI) system. Unlike dogs and cats, rabbits cannot vomit, so an obstruction of their GI tract can be fatal if not treated promptly.

ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital is one of the ONLY hospitals in the greater Los Angeles area that is capable of performing these surgeries on rabbits and other exotics 24/7, including nights and weekends.

Listen to Dr. Petritz on Pet Life Radio…

…bring your local veterinarian a sick dog or cat and they will adroitly determine what is ailing it. Bring them a guinea pig, hamster, bird or fish that ‘just isn’t right’ and they will likely be flummoxed. Though veterinarians are trained to care for all species, the nuances of tending to the general well being of small mammals, birds, reptiles and fish are a very focused subspecialty of pet care.

What can an owner of one of these unique pets do to keep them healthy? What are some of the common emergencies to which they are prone? What can they do to prevent them? The answer to these questions is a diplomate of the American College of Zoological Medicine. This is a title held by less than 200 veterinarians in the entire world. My guest, Olivia Petritz has the distinction of being one of two in this elite assemblage to hold a sub-specialty in Zoological Companion Animals. – Bernadine D. Cruz, D.V.M., Host on Pet Life Radio. (www.petliferadio.com)

Listen to the full interview/broadcast by clicking on the image below.

Exotics-radio

Listen to Dr. Branter on Pet Life Radio…

There is an adage attributed to surgeons – a chance to cut is a chance to cure. For a time, this statement was probably true. A doctor had a limited number of ways of seeing what was going on inside of a body and correcting a problem. Now humans and animals are benefiting from myriad of minimally invasive procedures that can diagnose, treat and often cure conditions where previously a scalpel could never go.

Erinne Branter is a board certified veterinary internist at Advanced Critical Care, Emergency and Specialty Services in Los Angeles who has harnessed the magic of interventional radiology and endoscopy. – Bernadine D. Cruz, D.V.M., Host on Pet Life Radio. (www.petliferadio.com)

Listen to the full interview/broadcast by clicking on the image below.

IR-radio

Another reason why we love cats…

With more than 43,000,000 views on YouTube, we thought we’d pass it along. 🙂

Where would our doctors be…

…without the support and assistance of our wonderful Technicians?

Here is Rhianna Depew, RVT* who is indispensable in helping Dr. Jana Norris (on the left) scrubbing in, monitoring anesthesia, and the many other important requirements of surgical procedures.

Rhianna, who is recognized for upholding excellent patient care before, during, and after surgery, also leads our team of Veterinary Technicians. And she does so by example. This includes teaching and training our technicians to ensure we are forever improving, and helping to keep track of and maintaining the immense inventory of surgical equipment required in a Specialty Animal Hospital.

Go Rhianna!

Jana-and-Rhianna

 

*Registered Veterinary Technician

Bo Bo Kitty

“Bo Bo Kitty”, our most handsome patient of the day, sits patiently with his mom at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital in the San Fernando Valley while waiting for his appointment with Internal Medicine Specialist, Dr. Elana Hadar.

(Understandably, where “Bo Bo Kitty” wants to sit, “Bo Bo Kitty” sits…)

Bo Bo Kitty

Meet ‘Biscuit’…

This is Biscuit – one of our favorite older feline patients. Biscuit had a carpal arthrodesis surgery (a fusion of his wrist) after having his carpus completely deranged following trauma. He is now eight weeks ‘post op’, out of his bandage and splint, and starting to use the limb well again, and on the road to a full recovery.

Oh, and he likes to snuggle and sit in laps when he comes to visit us…

(Here he is catching some quality time with Dr. Jana Norris at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital, San Fernando Valley.)

Biscuit
 

Ten minutes is all Geordie needed…

Geordie
This little guy, Geordie, has the unfortunate history of forming stones in his bladder.

A year ago, he had a minimally invasive procedure to remove his stones and lithotripsy (a medical procedure that uses shock waves to break up stones in the kidney, bladder, or ureter) to remove stones that were lodged in his urethra. Ouch.

Now Geordie is checked every one to three months with a simple X-ray to see if any new stones have formed and if so, to catch them while they are small. The good news is that we can deal with these small stones with a simple procedure (voiding urethrohydropulsion) to flush them out of the bladder.

This avoids any surgery and takes only ten minutes! (Of course Geordie is delighted as there is no need for surgery)
—–
To find out more about these amazing produces, please contact Dr. Branter at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital in Los Angeles.

Our ‘Exotic’ Doctor…

Avian-&-Exotics-Rack-Card

Olivia A. Petritz, DVM, DACZM

ACCESS – LOS ANGELES
Although all American College of Zoological Medicine (ACZM)* Diplomates have the same ‘DACZM’ title, several years ago ACZM created a sub-specialty that encompasses all exotic pet species such as small mammals, rodents, birds, reptiles, and fish, and gave it the title: ‘ZCA’ for ‘Zoological Companion Animal’.

The first person in the world to acquire this unique veterinary qualification resides in Germany. The second was Olivia A. Petritz, DVM, DACZM.

With her degree in veterinary medicine from Purdue University, a three-year ACZM residency at UC Davis in Companion Avian and Exotic Pet Medicine, an internship in small animal medicine and critical care in San Diego, and a specialty internship in avian and exotic animal medicine in Houston, she is a wonderful member of the ACCESS Team.

Kept his kidney and was in and out in a day…

When ‘Albany’ – a lovely Bichon Frise – arrived at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital in Los Angeles, she was in trouble.

A stone in her ureteral (a small tube that links the kidney to the bladder) had led to an infection and an abscess in her kidney. Usually, treatment requires open surgery with the possibility of removing the kidney, the most common course of action.

However, Dr. Branter  and Dr. Blackburn chose a more modern and less invasive approach. Using a combination of cystoscopy (scope in the bladder) and fluoroscopy (video X-ray) – see below pictures – they were able to place a ureteral ‘stent’ and drain the painful and dangerous abscess.

The good news is that little Ablany required no incisions, was able to keep her kidney, and what’s more, was able to return home the same day.

Go Albany!

stent-fluoro-AlbanyThis is a fluoroscopy picture showing the spine and the sent with on loop in the kidney and one loop in the bladder. Now the urine can pass freely into the bladder.

stent-in-bladder-cystoscopy-AlbanyThis is a picture of the stent in the bladder. The loops are what holds the stent in place in the bladder and the kidney.

UVJ-cystoscopy-AlbanyUVJ (ureterovesicular junction): this is a picture of an opening where urine enter the bladder from the kidney (via the ureter). This is the tube that we place small wires and catheters to allow entry into the kidney.

* A ureteral stent, sometimes called a ureteric stent, is a thin tube inserted into the ureter to prevent or treat obstruction of the urine flow from the kidney.

To find out more about these amazing produces, please contact Dr. Branter at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital in Los Angeles.

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Locations

South Bay

2551 W. 190th St., Torrance, CA 90504

Tel: (310) 320-8300 - Fax: (424) 293-7254

Los Angeles

9599 Jefferson Blvd., Culver City, CA 90232

Tel: (310) 558-6100 - Fax: (310) 558-6199

San Fernando Valley

20051 Ventura Blvd., Woodland Hills, CA 91364

Tel: (818) 887-2262 - Fax: (818) 704-0323

Central Valley

4300 Easton Drive, Bakersfield, CA 93309

Tel: (661) 281-1320 - Fax: (661) 302-4193

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