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Our ‘Exotic’ Doctor…

Avian-&-Exotics-Rack-Card

Olivia A. Petritz, DVM, DACZM

ACCESS – LOS ANGELES
Although all American College of Zoological Medicine (ACZM)* Diplomates have the same ‘DACZM’ title, several years ago ACZM created a sub-specialty that encompasses all exotic pet species such as small mammals, rodents, birds, reptiles, and fish, and gave it the title: ‘ZCA’ for ‘Zoological Companion Animal’.

The first person in the world to acquire this unique veterinary qualification resides in Germany. The second was Olivia A. Petritz, DVM, DACZM.

With her degree in veterinary medicine from Purdue University, a three-year ACZM residency at UC Davis in Companion Avian and Exotic Pet Medicine, an internship in small animal medicine and critical care in San Diego, and a specialty internship in avian and exotic animal medicine in Houston, she is a wonderful member of the ACCESS Team.

Kept his kidney and was in and out in a day…

When ‘Albany’ – a lovely Bichon Frise – arrived at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital in Los Angeles, she was in trouble.

A stone in her ureteral (a small tube that links the kidney to the bladder) had led to an infection and an abscess in her kidney. Usually, treatment requires open surgery with the possibility of removing the kidney, the most common course of action.

However, Dr. Branter  and Dr. Blackburn chose a more modern and less invasive approach. Using a combination of cystoscopy (scope in the bladder) and fluoroscopy (video X-ray) – see below pictures – they were able to place a ureteral ‘stent’ and drain the painful and dangerous abscess.

The good news is that little Ablany required no incisions, was able to keep her kidney, and what’s more, was able to return home the same day.

Go Albany!

stent-fluoro-AlbanyThis is a fluoroscopy picture showing the spine and the sent with on loop in the kidney and one loop in the bladder. Now the urine can pass freely into the bladder.

stent-in-bladder-cystoscopy-AlbanyThis is a picture of the stent in the bladder. The loops are what holds the stent in place in the bladder and the kidney.

UVJ-cystoscopy-AlbanyUVJ (ureterovesicular junction): this is a picture of an opening where urine enter the bladder from the kidney (via the ureter). This is the tube that we place small wires and catheters to allow entry into the kidney.

* A ureteral stent, sometimes called a ureteric stent, is a thin tube inserted into the ureter to prevent or treat obstruction of the urine flow from the kidney.

To find out more about these amazing produces, please contact Dr. Branter at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital in Los Angeles.

Girls just want to have fun…

…not always true for two of our hard-working team-members – Rachelle Surrency, Chief Operating Officer, ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital Group, and Dr. Joyce Lee, who works in our Critical Care and Emergency Department at our San Fernando Valley Hospital.

Rachelle-Surrency-Dr-Jocye-Lee
 

iSleepy.

‘iSleepy’? There’s a nap for that.

Cute.

Sleeping dog

(Pic taken at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital, San Fernando Valley.)

We really do love them all…

Billy, a two year old Pacman frog, otherwise known as an Ornate Horned Frog, was brought to ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital (Los Angeles) on emergency for a possible dislocated shoulder. After we performed a complete physical exam, we found he had an impaction in his stomach which was so large it was pushing his arm and shoulder in an abnormal position.

Our ‘Exotics’ veterinarian, Dr. Petritz, anesthetized Billy to perform endoscopy of his stomach in coordination with one of our internal medicine specialists, Dr. Branter .

The great news is that Dr. Petritz, Dr. Branter and their team were able to relieve the impaction, and are happy to report Billy is back to his normal self, and croaking away.

IR-frog-2

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Locations

South Bay

2325 Torrance Blvd., Torrance, CA 90501

Tel: (310) 320-8300 - Fax: (424) 293-7254

Los Angeles

9599 Jefferson Blvd., Culver City, CA 90232

Tel: (310) 558-6100 - Fax: (310) 558-6199

San Fernando Valley

20051 Ventura Blvd., Woodland Hills, CA 91364

Tel: (818) 887-2262 - Fax: (818) 704-0323

Central Valley

4300 Easton Drive, Bakersfield, CA 93309

Tel: (661) 281-1320 - Fax: (661) 302-4193

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