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ACCESS-Animal-Hospital-Blog

Have a little heart…

Brody is a young French Bulldog that was born with a heart murmur.

Using an ultrasound of the heart called an echocardiogram, Dr. Jason Arndt from ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital’s Veterinary Cardiology Department, was able to indentify ‘severe pulmonic stenosis’, a narrowing of the pulmonic outflow from the right ventricle of the heart in little Brody .

The narrowing was putting a large amount of stress on the right side of Brody’s heart, so an interventional procedure called a ‘balloon valvuloplasty’ was performed which significantly improved the stenosis.

Even better news is that the little guy was able to return home the following day!

Below is a picture of Brody’s ‘angiogram’ showing the pulmonic stenosis. (An angiogram is an imaging technique that uses fluoroscopy to visualize blood flow to the arteries and veins.)

Brody-angiogram-Veterinary-Cardiology

The Cardiology Services at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospitals specializes in minimally invasive correction of many congenital cardiac diseases in animals.

 

We know how it feels…

We take care of every patient at ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospitals as though they were part of our own family. Occasionally though, our staff members experience medical emergencies with their own pets which reminds us how it feels to entrust others with the care of our furry family.

Kali-Surgery-PhotoThis is exactly what happened to Kristen, a surgery assistant to Jana Norris, DVM, DACVS.

Kali, her dog, wasn’t eating, had vomited a few times, and just didn’t seem like herself, so just in case, Kristen brought her to work.

It’s a good thing she did. A physical examination, blood test, and an ultrasound by Dr. Elana Hadar revealed an enlarged and very inflamed kidney that was near failure. At that point we knew what had to be done: she needed her kidney removed, and it needed to be done quickly.

Kristen responded to the news as a loving and worried pet owner and not as an employee. She felt confident all would be well, but struggled to keep back the tears and needed a hug. So instead of her usual role of being part of the surgical process – helping owners admit their pets into the hospital, prepping animals for surgery, and assisting the surgery team – Dr. Norris and the rest of our staff insisted that they would handle everything.

So Kali was prepped for surgery, protocol was set, and the team at ACCESS San Fernando Valley swung into action.

Good news! It wasn’t long before Kristen was told that the surgery went very smoothly, and the prognosis for Kali’s recovery was excellent. Kali, who had won the hearts of all who cared for her, recovered quickly and comfortably, and continues to improve at home, looking and acting better than ever!

Go Kali and Kristen!

We know that you love your pet – your companion and your friend. We also know the stress and worry that comes along when they are sick, and we know the pain and heartache when tragedy strikes. We love our pets and would do anything for them, which is why we take care of every patient as if they were our own, because we know how much you love them.

‘Light It Up Blue’

Go-Blue

Did you know that 1 in 68 children are diagnosed with autism. 1 in 42 are boys and 1 in 189 are girls.*

As part of a unique global initiative, Autism Speaks (the world’s leading autism science and advocacy organization), along with the international autism community, kicks-off Autism Awareness Month, beginning April 2, with ‘Light It Up Blue’.

‘Light It Up Blue’ is a unique global initiative that helps raise awareness about autism, when many iconic landmarks, hotels, sporting venues, concert halls, museums, bridges and retail stores are among the hundreds of thousands of homes and communities that take part to ‘Light It Up Blue’. So join us and the world in ‘Lighting It Up Blue’ to spread not only awareness but acceptance!

Click here to find out more… http://liub.autismspeaks.org/welcome

Better still, click on ‘Taz’, an autism service dog, to download the app to pledge your support and make your photos go Blue!

Go-Blue-Dog

Go-Blue-ACCESS*CDC

A Continuing Education event for Veterinary Technicians…

Chocolate! Humans may love it, but it’s awful for cats and dogs. So are grapes, raisins, macadamia nuts, nicotine, onion/garlic, bread dough (raw), zinc pennies, xylitol, spot-on flea products, illicit drugs, NSAIDs, and, wait for it, tremorogenic mycotoxins!

To find out more, join Dr. Hickey for a lecture and lab on indoor toxins, how to recognize symptons, and what treatment should be considered.

When: Thursday, April 3, 2014
Time: 6:30 pm – Refreshments and introduction | 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm Lecture and Lab
Where: ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital, Los Angeles.

All technicians are welcome to attend.

Please RSVP to:

Carmen Alivera
Tel: 310-558-6100
Email: calivera@accessvetmed.com
Web: www.AccessVetMed.com

8-CE-Veterinary-Emergency-Medicine-April

A little girl and her dog…

zane

 
When Zane’s buddy wanted to show him support, she dressed-up for the occasion.

How cute is that?

Zane was presented for anemia* from an unknown cause. After checking blood-work and abdominal imaging, Dr. Amanda Blackburn (Department of Internal Medicine) was able to diagnose Zane with an immune condition that attacks the red blood cells (immune mediated hemolytic anemia) and begin treatment.

At his check-up appointment last week Zane was responding very well and is feeling good. To ensure all goes well, which will no doubt please both him and his little princess, the team at ACCESS Speciality Animal Hospital in Los Angeles will be rechecking his progress and adjusting his treatment plan over the next three to four months.

……………………………………………………………………….

*Anemia is the result of an abnormal breakdown of red blood cells, and as this is where Hemoglobin delivers oxygen to the tissues and cells, symptoms resulting from a ‘lack of oxygen’ can be ‘pale or white gums’, lethargy, shortness of breath, and a general lack of stamina.

This Thursday: Learn how to protect animals from Rat Poison.

Rodenticide, colloquially known as ‘Rat Poison’, injures or kills thousands of family pets and wildlife each year, and is among the most common cases we treat in our Emergency rooms.

Dr-Lisa-Mahlum-San-Fernando-ValleyNow we’re delighted to announce that Lisa Mahlum, MS, DVM, DACVECC (of our San Fernando Valley Specialty Animal Hospital) will be speaking on behalf of the veterinary community to help educate pet owners about its dangers, what symptoms to look for, and how pets can be treated.

So please join Dr. Mahlum at the Calabasas Public Library Founders Hall this Thursday, March 13, from 6:00pm to 8:00pm to learn how to protect your pet (and local wildlife) from this silent and deadly killer.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Anticoagulant-Rodenticides-Forum

Valentino – now hopping happy.

Valentino-Avian-Exotics-Vet-Care
 
Valentino is a 6+ year old rabbit that was referred to us for a bloated stomach, and not eating or defecating. Our exotics specialist, Dr. Olivia Petritz, performed emergency surgery early in the morning, and removed an obstruction from his intestines. He did great after surgery, and has never looked back!

A rabbit that is not eating or defecating, even for as little as 4-6 hours, should be brought to an exotics veterinarian as soon as possible. This condition is commonly known as “GI stasis” and is a symptom of many underlying diseases, one of which is an obstruction of their gastrotintestinal (GI) system. Unlike dogs and cats, rabbits cannot vomit, so an obstruction of their GI tract can be fatal if not treated promptly.

ACCESS Specialty Animal Hospital is one of the ONLY hospitals in the greater Los Angeles area that is capable of performing these surgeries on rabbits and other exotics 24/7, including nights and weekends.

Listen to Dr. Petritz on Pet Life Radio…

…bring your local veterinarian a sick dog or cat and they will adroitly determine what is ailing it. Bring them a guinea pig, hamster, bird or fish that ‘just isn’t right’ and they will likely be flummoxed. Though veterinarians are trained to care for all species, the nuances of tending to the general well being of small mammals, birds, reptiles and fish are a very focused subspecialty of pet care.

What can an owner of one of these unique pets do to keep them healthy? What are some of the common emergencies to which they are prone? What can they do to prevent them? The answer to these questions is a diplomate of the American College of Zoological Medicine. This is a title held by less than 200 veterinarians in the entire world. My guest, Olivia Petritz has the distinction of being one of two in this elite assemblage to hold a sub-specialty in Zoological Companion Animals. – Bernadine D. Cruz, D.V.M., Host on Pet Life Radio. (www.petliferadio.com)

Listen to the full interview/broadcast by clicking on the image below.

Exotics-radio

Listen to Dr. Branter on Pet Life Radio…

There is an adage attributed to surgeons – a chance to cut is a chance to cure. For a time, this statement was probably true. A doctor had a limited number of ways of seeing what was going on inside of a body and correcting a problem. Now humans and animals are benefiting from myriad of minimally invasive procedures that can diagnose, treat and often cure conditions where previously a scalpel could never go.

Erinne Branter is a board certified veterinary internist at Advanced Critical Care, Emergency and Specialty Services in Los Angeles who has harnessed the magic of interventional radiology and endoscopy. – Bernadine D. Cruz, D.V.M., Host on Pet Life Radio. (www.petliferadio.com)

Listen to the full interview/broadcast by clicking on the image below.

IR-radio

Another reason why we love cats…

With more than 43,000,000 views on YouTube, we thought we’d pass it along. 🙂

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Locations

South Bay

2325 Torrance Blvd., Torrance, CA 90501

Tel: (310) 320-8300 - Fax: (424) 293-7254

Los Angeles

9599 Jefferson Blvd., Culver City, CA 90232

Tel: (310) 558-6100 - Fax: (310) 558-6199

San Fernando Valley

20051 Ventura Blvd., Woodland Hills, CA 91364

Tel: (818) 887-2262 - Fax: (818) 704-0323

Central Valley

4300 Easton Drive, Bakersfield, CA 93309

Tel: (661) 281-1320 - Fax: (661) 302-4193

Click here for maps (and to find directions)